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annadoesthings:

larameeee:

Girl Carrying BullVladimir Fokanov

Goals
(when my two loves come together)

I love old art and lifting heavy things (not usually bulls, though I’ll try anything once)

annadoesthings:

larameeee:

Girl Carrying Bull
Vladimir Fokanov

Goals

(when my two loves come together)

I love old art and lifting heavy things (not usually bulls, though I’ll try anything once)

Photoset

fahbulus:

bun bun

For @themindofaconservator

(Source: youtube.com, via therippedlibrarian)

Text

Fighting Art with Art

medievalpoc:

a-thousand-crows replied to your post: Twitter adventures in art history…

So true. I’ve never looked at a work of art and felt personally invigorated. I can see a caricature of me in the midground and background, scrubbing floors and grooming white people. White people get to see themselves in that foreground. Art has power.

I am trying to do everything I possibly can so change this. Because I too want to look at art and feel personally invigorated, and if its possible for others to see beauty and power in the past for themselves, I want that for them also. We can create our own narrative.

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Link

medievalpoc:

captain-curbstomp reblogged your post Fighting Art with Art and added:

I’ve got mad hots for the paladin.

I assume you mean this image?

image

Her name is Xiang Fei, a Chinese woman of a Muslim ethnic minority there (of the Uighur peoples), wearing Italian plate armor.

Here’s…

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tierradentro:

A fight at the Ukrainian Parliament transformed into a Caravaggio-like painting… that’s why we love the internet. :-D
(Photo credit: Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)

tierradentro:

A fight at the Ukrainian Parliament transformed into a Caravaggio-like painting… that’s why we love the internet. :-D

(Photo credit: Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)

(via detailsdetales)

Quote
"In 1961, just three drops later, a new lecturer called John Mainstone adopted the experiment after a colleague pointed it out, gathering dust in a cupboard. He eventually persuaded the university to put it on display and the drops became talking points. Prof Mainstone, however, never saw the pitch in motion. In 1979, the sixth drop went on a weekend. In 1988, with the experiment proudly displayed at Brisbane’s World Expo, Prof Mainstone was fetching a drink when the seventh drop fell. By 2000, a video camera had been set up to capture drop number eight, but it malfunctioned at the crucial moment."

Tedium, tragedy and tar: The slowest drops in science | BBC Science

Who knew bitumen could be so fascinating?

(via clambistro)

(via clambistro)

Photoset

conservethis:

whitesparrowbindery:

Beanie Baby Conversion

Soft weights are an essential tool in any bookbinding or book/paper conservation studio.  Talas sells bag weights in a variety of weights, but they can be pricey - 1 lb weights are $12.85 each (plus shipping).

Old Beanie Babies (and who doesn’t have a pile of those lying around) can easily be converted into bag weights that are cute and economical.

1. Start with the Beanie Baby of your choice.  The older style with flat tummies work the best.

2. Use a seam ripper to rip out some of the stitches on the Beanie’s back. I like to start near the tail. (Once I tried opening a Beanie Baby on the seam under his tail and between his legs, but it felt waaaaaaay too creepy).

3.  There is a mesh panel sewn into this spot.  It’s designed to prevent little ones from choking on PVC pellets should the stitching come apart. Cut it out.

4. Empty the PVC pellets out into a bowl.  Don’t worry about getting every last one - you’ll put some back later.  You can leave the stuffing in the head alone.

5. Weigh out your desired amount of shot.  I can find copper coated shot at my local sporting goods store.  I can get four 1 lb weights from one bottle.  I’ve also seen zinc coated shot.  Avoid using uncoated lead shot - you don’t want to get lead poisoning!  I like to use a paper bowl to hold the shot when weighing - I can then fold it on one side to facilitate pouring the shot into the Beanie.

6. Pour the shot into the Beanie.  1 lb of shot takes up less space inside the Beanie than the original PVC pellets, so I like to put some of the pellets back into my little critter so that he feels full.

7.  Here is a batch of refilled Beanie Babies waiting to be sewn up.

8.  Sew up the opening you made using matching thread.  If you’re not a sewer, check out his video on How to Sew a Teddy Bear Closed.

And there you have it - Beanie Baby soft weights!

In my house we used to have “Beanie Baby Wars” where my sister and I would fling them at each other and try to hit one another. I don’t recommend doing that with these babies.

Brilliance

(via themindofaconservator)

Photo
compoundchem:

For today, here’s a quick update to an old graphic on the discovery dates of the different elements, rearranged to make it easier to print. See a bigger version and grab the download on the site: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-3w

compoundchem:

For today, here’s a quick update to an old graphic on the discovery dates of the different elements, rearranged to make it easier to print. 

See a bigger version and grab the download on the site: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-3w

(via misty-aurora-blue)

Photoset

ffyesyes:

How to make a contour maker:
Ingredients: a piece of corrugated plastic sheet (coroplast), medical applicator sticks or bamboo skewers (make sure they are the skinny kind 2.3mm thick), twill tape.
1. Cut coroplast to the shape you want and cut a window along it, the thickness of the twill tape. Make little slits at either side of the window.
2. Make a loopdy loop with the twill tape and stitch it in place.
3 Start threading the sticks 2 per coroplast hole and weave the twill tape through them. Keep the tape taught.
4. Keep doing that forever
5 finish the twill tape with another loopdy loop and if you want put a stick in it to easily adjust tension on the tape.
6. Get the contour of things.
7. Take your contour thing home and contour everything in your life instead of using it for conservation.

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varnishisapowerfulliquid:

Identifying Craquelure on Paintings
Top Left: Typical 14th and 15 C Italian panel, grain vertical; Cracks on 15th C Italian panels can have two distinct generations or widths, tend to be jagged and have a predominant direction perpendicular to the wood grain.
Top Right: Typical 16th C Flemish panel, grain vertical; Cracks on 16th C Flemish panels tend to be small, orderly, of uniform width, and parallel to the wood grain.
Bottom Left: Typical 17th C Dutch canvas, warp horizontal; Cracks on 17th C Dutch canvas paintings may be straight, jagged, and perpendicular to the warp.
Bottom Right: Typical 18th C French canvas, warp horizontal; Cracks on 18th C French canvas paintings are more random, curved, large, and are usually connected. 
None of these statements are always true, but can be used as a general guideline; many characteristics depend on the artist’s individual methods and materials. 
Source: directly quoted from Conservation of Easel Paintings, Joyce Hill Stoner and Rebecca Rushfield, 2012.

Stoner is my homegirl

varnishisapowerfulliquid:

Identifying Craquelure on Paintings

Top Left: Typical 14th and 15 C Italian panel, grain vertical; Cracks on 15th C Italian panels can have two distinct generations or widths, tend to be jagged and have a predominant direction perpendicular to the wood grain.

Top Right: Typical 16th C Flemish panel, grain vertical; Cracks on 16th C Flemish panels tend to be small, orderly, of uniform width, and parallel to the wood grain.

Bottom Left: Typical 17th C Dutch canvas, warp horizontal; Cracks on 17th C Dutch canvas paintings may be straight, jagged, and perpendicular to the warp.

Bottom Right: Typical 18th C French canvas, warp horizontal; Cracks on 18th C French canvas paintings are more random, curved, large, and are usually connected. 

None of these statements are always true, but can be used as a general guideline; many characteristics depend on the artist’s individual methods and materials. 

Source: directly quoted from Conservation of Easel Paintings, Joyce Hill Stoner and Rebecca Rushfield, 2012.

Stoner is my homegirl